Tag Archives: Leadership

Just because I wasn’t there doesn’t mean it wasn’t worthwhile!

I have guilty parent syndrome.

The challenge of fitting 4 weeks annual leave into 16 weeks of school holidays every year leaves me thinking that my boys have missed out; that their holiday experiences have not been worthwhile.

It’s not that my wife or myself do not spend time with our boys during the school breaks, it’s just we simply cannot spend ALL the time with them. We tend to assume to role of holiday program coordinator for when we’re not available – arranging incredible people to hang with them and for visits to friends. This often includes park trips, movies, swimming, sleepovers, theme parks, sport and for one of our boys this recent holiday, even a speed boat adventure!

So on the face of it, I reckon our boys thoroughly enjoy their holidays. And they enthusiastically (well, mostly…) proclaim they do.

It’s just that if I’m not there, I tend to think it wasn’t worthwhile… guilty parent syndrome.

Whilst my presence changes the dynamic and is certainly important, my absence does NOT equate to a lack of value. And this is something that seeps into other areas of my life. It’s almost as if I’m suggesting that without my direct involvement, something isn’t as worthwhile for all the other participants. This is more about my insecurity than anything else.

I need to have confidence in the plans I have developed, the people I have engaged  and allow them to create an experience with their touch. This then allows for those times when I am directly involved, for experiences to be flavoured by me, a genuine point of difference!

Whether it be family or work or anywhere else, we need to ascertain when we can be directly engaged and those times when we can’t, or perhaps, even shouldn’t. Empowering others should make an activity more worthwhile, not less.

Let’s create an experience-rich environment for our families and colleagues, with and without us!

LET HOPE RISE.

Lessons from a lost ship

Did you know Australia has a Chief Scientist?

No? Well, we do and in early March our newly appointed Chief Scientist, Dr Finkel, addressed the National Press Club as part of an event run by Science & Technology Australia.

Dr Finkel shared a story about a small nation with middle-power ambitions. A nation in transition with a growing population and a commodity-based economy.

…But this small nation was well aware of its uncertain place in a strategic region at a volatile time. So it embarked on a bold exercise to build a flagship for its navy that would also be a statement about its place in the world.

The setting is Sweden, four hundred year ago, in 1625. Now this was no ordinary ship that the Swedes contracted the Dutch, who subcontracted the Germans, Danes and Finns, to build. This was something that no-one in Sweden had ever attempted before: a 135 foot warship with two decks, each bearing 36 cannons.

And it had to be built on the keel of the 110 foot, one-deck warship the contractors were initially instructed to build. That ship was half done when the King changed his mind – inspired by the thought of an extra deck, with extra cannons.

So the builders set to work, and they did their best to adapt the keel, while the King went off to fight his war with Poland.

By August 1628 the ship was ready. All of Stockholm gathered at the harbour for the launch of this mighty symbol of Swedish pride. And all of Stockholm was still there when, twenty minutes after the launch, tilted by the gentle nudge of a light sea breeze, it sank – less than one nautical mile from dock.

This ship – the Vasa – has sailed into business school history: as the textbook case in innovation done wrong.

The ship and 53 lives were lost as a result.

That ship sat on the bottom of the harbour for 333 years. Then it was raised in 1961 – almost perfectly preserved, ornamental mermaids and all. Raising it was a phenomenal feat of ingenuity and engineering. It was installed in a purpose-built museum, where more than a million people every year line up to see it. To Sweden, the Vasa is now a great source of national pride.

Because Sweden didn’t give up on building ships. They built two-deck gunships. They built three-deck gunships. Gunships that became the pride of the Swedish military for the next thirty years.

They helped to usher in the age the Swedes call stormaktstiden – the Great Power Period.

Failure – repurposed as a symbol of success.

But we don’t have to get there from the bottom of the harbour.

Let’s take the direct path to our own stormaktstiden, our Great Power Period.

LET HOPE RISE

Oiling when there is no noise…

We’ve all heard the saying ‘the noisy wheel gets the oil’ (or a version thereof!), but what about the wheel from which no squeak emanates; the wheel that just seems to be working? What do we do about that?

Place this in the context of relationships – be it within the family, the workplace, a team. Much leadership effort can be consumed by the ‘noisy wheel’ – the person requiring emotional support, the team member with the knowledge gap, the child regularly ‘in trouble’. And whilst investing energy and resources into the individual is required, we must ensure it’s not at the expense of others. Just because there’s no noise, doesn’t mean oil is not required!

We need to be deliberate in how we invest into people. We need to manage our own capacity to ensure we have sufficient in reserve to extinguish bush fires that flare whilst consistently checking on the health and well-being of those not so noisy. Each of us benefits from acknowledgement of a job well done, encouragement in the face of adversity, opportunities to learn and grow, but it may not be as obvious in some of us.

Make a decision today to look around your world – your workplace, your family, your team – the person not making noise could be the one needing the oil.

LET HOPE RISE

Just do something!

My life has been characterised by potential. Mostly unrealised potential. This has caused me significant frustration, equating this to a lack of value in myself, thinking that I have let other’s down. Thankfully I am now aware of this and have been working upon this not-so-desirable aspect of myself. The key I hold onto are three words my wife once said to me “…just do something!”.

The context was me expressing how I thought I had let down my wife and my family. It was a major league pity party. After my emotional release, I was surprised by my wife’s response “I really don’t care what you do, just do something!!”.

WOW!

This was not the 5 step plan that would have removed all responsibility from my shoulders. This was not the “my poor darling” join in the pity-party approach. This was tough love. This was my wife undeniably backing me whilst challenging me to step up and be the difference I so sorely wanted to be.

I’m not there yet. I sometimes feel old and that I’ve missed something somewhere. But I also know that this potential within me will continue to be realised and progressively ‘topped up’. My desire to empower, enable and equip others has taken many forms over the years and I know I have been gifted an ability to help others realise their vision. I can practically create a sense of order around a dream that otherwise seemed chaotic.

Stepping into potential begins with just that, a step. Even if we’re not confident we’re stepping in the right direction, at least we’re moving! Let’s start by just doing SOMETHING!

LET HOPE RISE

Courage to change

Change really is inevitable. It is one constant in our world, in our lives, and it demands a response.

We can choose to ignore change and be overtaken by it. We can choose to simply understand it. Or we can choose to embrace and facilitate it.

Change simply for the sake of change is not what I’m talking about here. I’m talking about change that is brought about by a genuine desire to improve, a desire to be more effective, a desire for excellence. This examines the why and the how of what we are doing (personally and corporately). It determines if what we’re doing is necessary and, if so, asks the question “how can we do this better?”.

As initiators or leaders of change, our capacity has to concurrently grow. If we have decided that change is necessary, then by default we are saying who we were will not take us to where we need to go. It is recognition that what has been is not sufficient for what will be. And that’s okay! This is the essence of change. Identifying how we personally can grow; how we can seek opportunities that enlarge us, that increase our capacity.

Stepping into our future, we cannot allow our history nor our background to negatively influence what could be. The baggage from past failures, missed opportunities, silly mistakes must be put aside if we’re to claim our future. Along with our enlarged capacity, both our vision and belief must also change.

How are you responding to change in your world?

LET HOPE RISE

Image credit: nexusplexus / 123RF Stock Photo

Have you lost the budgie?

Our six-year-old was excited to receive a baby budgerigar as his first pet. Hand-reared and only a few weeks out of the nest, it was incredibly comfortable using him as a perch and was even beginning to feed directly from his hand. An inside bird, its young wings were not yet clipped and so the rules were very clear – it could be outside the cage only if all house doors were closed.

This worked well for the first week.

In the second week, our son asked if he could take the bird outside, thinking it may enjoy the trampoline. Of course, the collective response from parents and older siblings was negative, again identifying the fact it could fly and would most likely fly away. Desperate to introduce it to the excitement of the trampoline, our boy ignored the response and headed outdoors. The budgie obviously wasn’t as enthralled by the trampoline as its handler and promptly flew off. The ensuing door-to-door search failed to find the bird, leaving one six-year-old distraught with, hopefully, a clearer understanding of consequence of actions. His siblings were also affected as they too had warmed to this new family member yet were now bearing the weight of this outcome as well.

I reckon we’ve all lost a budgie at some point. We’ve ignored the facts, the advice and then had to endure the consequence of our actions. Our son seemed to understand the bird would fly away yet such was his intent, he chose to ignore the facts. Sometimes our intentions can be so strong, that we disregard the reality.

The metaphorical budgie for us could be a friendship, a career, a business opportunity or anything else we deem as valuable. Yes, we sometimes have to take a punt, have a go despite the known risks. But when the reality is perfectly clear and the negative outcome is unavoidable, we need to simply stop. If we proceed we are clearly stating we are prepared to accept the consequences both for ourselves AND on behalf of all others who will be impacted yet have had no control over our initial action. Are we really prepared to do that? Should we do that?

As a pet, it’s better for the bird to be restricted in its environment than seeking to survive in a world for which it is ill-equipped, despite our want. What’s your budgie?

LET HOPE RISE

Image credit: ionia / 123RF Stock Photo